To whom are you speaking?” is the most correct, very formal, seldom used in conversation, except in formal exchanges — maybe in a telephone conversation. “Who are you talking to?” is grammatically incorrect, but it is a generally acceptable piece of colloquial conversation.
Who talks about the hidden curriculum? hidden curriculum in schools.

Who I talked to or whom I talked to?

To whom are you speaking?” is the most correct, very formal, seldom used in conversation, except in formal exchanges — maybe in a telephone conversation. “Who are you talking to?” is grammatically incorrect, but it is a generally acceptable piece of colloquial conversation.

Who or whom did you talk to?

Whom should be used to refer to the object of a verb or preposition. When in doubt, try this simple trick: If you can replace the word with “he”’ or “’she,” use who. If you can replace it with “him” or “her,” use whom. Who should be used to refer to the subject of a sentence.

Who vs whom examples sentences?

“Who,” the subjective pronoun, is the doer of an action. For example, “That’s the girl who scored the goal.” It is the subject of “scored” because the girl was doing the scoring. Then, “whom,” as the objective pronoun, receives the action. For instance, “Whom do you like best?” It is the object of “like”.

Who is speaking to whom here answer?

In formal English, “to whom am I speaking” would be correct. “Whom” is the objective form of “who,” and “whom” is the object of the preposition “to” in the sentence “to whom am I speaking?”. However, here in the USA at least, we usually refrain from using the most formal kind of English in ordinary conversation.

Who is the speaker whom is he speaking to?

The speaker is Shylock. He was talking to Antonio.

Which vs who vs whom?

Use who and whom to refer to people. Use “who” when you refer to the subject of a clause and “whom” when you refer to the object of a clause (for information regarding subjects versus objects, please refer to Sentence Elements).

Did they talk or talked?

Honestly, they both mean the same thing in most cases. Did you talk to her is simply asking someone if he or she talked to her. Have you talked to her is simply asking someone if he or she talked to her.

Who is walking Who or whom?

The quick test in choosing between who and whom is to substitute he or him. If he sounds better, who is correct; if him sounds right, whom is correct. That’s because as a pronoun whom is used to represent the object of either a verb or a preposition, while who represents the subject of a verb.

Who did you go with or whom did you go with?

The pronoun “who” serves as the object of the preposition “with”; therefore, it should be “whom.” Technically, the questions should read, “Whom did you go with to the park?” and also “With whom did you go to the park.” Yet, in your question, the first proposed wording (“who did you go with to the park” is much more …

Who vs whom in a question?

If the preposition is at the end of the question, informal English uses “who” instead of “whom.” (As seen in “Who will I speak with” above.) … However, if the question begins with a preposition, you will need to use “whom,” whether the sentence is formal or informal. (As in “With whom will I speak?”)

How do you use whom examples?

  1. He saw the faces of those whom he loved at his birthday celebration.
  2. She saw a lady whom she presumed worked at the store, and she asked her a question.
  3. Here dwells an old woman with whom I would like to converse.
Whose Who's Who?

Whose is the possessive form of the pronoun who, while who’s is a contraction of the words who is or who has. However, many people still find whose and who’s particularly confusing because, in English, an apostrophe followed by an s usually indicates the possessive form of a word.

Who I trust or whom I trust?

The sentence is correct, however, there is a rule about the use of who versus whom. In formal English, who is used when referring to the subject, while whom is used when referring to the object. So in formal English it would be grammatically better to use whom , since whom is the object of the verb ‘to trust’.

Who I interviewed or whom I interviewed?

Whom did you interview? (Just like You interviewed them.) The statement that started this discussion was: “It’s who I am.” And since the verb is a form of “to be,” it’s correct to say “who.”

Is it who or whom do I have the pleasure of speaking with?

As for the ‘who vs whom’ rule, it seems very stilted if we use whom to replace a direct object, as in “Whom do you love?” However, it just sounds intelligent to say, “To whom do I have the pleasure of speaking?” instead of, “Whom am I speaking to?” Besides, a preposition is something we should never end a sentence with …

Who is parliament speaker?

Speaker of the Lok SabhaIncumbent Om Birla since 19 June 2019Lok SabhaStyleThe Hon’ble (formal) Mr. Speaker (informal)StatusChairman and presiding officer

Who is the speaker and what is he talking about?

Answer: The speaker is the admirer of the cuckoo. he was talking to the bird.

Why does she ask the listener to be Hanuman?

Answer: She asks the listener to be Hanuman because Alka who is supposed to play the role is sick.

Who Whom should I contact?

It is always correct to say “whom” to contact, and never correct to say “who” to contact. Think about it. “You should contact me, him, us, them” – not “You should contact I, he, she, we, they”. Therefore we use “whom”, the Objective or Accusative case.

Is whose and who's the same?

Who’s. Who’s is a contraction linking the words who is or who has, and whose is the possessive form of who. They may sound the same, but spelling them correctly can be tricky.

Is talked a correct word?

Both words are grammatically correct. “Spoke” implies that something important was said. “Talked” does not suggest that the conversation really mattered.

Do you talk to or talk with?

A lot of students ask me about the difference between talk to and talk with. The answer is that there’s essentially NO difference when two people are having a conversation, and both of them are speaking. You can say “Sue is talking to John” or “Sue is talking with John” – they’re the same!

How does talking different from speaking?

The only difference is that speak is more formal than talk. For example, talking to a friend is casual while speaking with your students is more formal and informative. Further, talking is more like striking a conversation (2 ways) while speaking comes from the noun speech, which often means relaying information.

Who do I ask or whom do I ask?

Is it “Who to Ask” or “Whom to Ask”? The grammatically correct way to phrase this is whom to ask. The phrase to ask really means should I ask. Whenever we need a pronoun that refers to the subject, we use who.

Who I assume or whom I assume?

The test is to split off the sub-clause into its own sentence, replacing ‘who’ or ‘whom’ with ‘him’ or ‘her’ (singular) or ‘them’ (plural) and moving it to follow the verb as in a normal simple sentence structure. If that doesn’t work, then assume that ‘who’ is correct.

Who did go or who went?

Which is correct, ‘who went with him’ or ‘who did go with him’? Both are correct. “Who went with him” is more common because it can be used in casual conversations.

Can you say with whom?

The commonly repeated advice for remembering whether to use who or whom is this: If you can replace the word with he or she or another subject pronoun, use who. If you can replace it with him or her (or another object pronoun), use whom.

What's another word for whom?

In this page you can discover 7 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for whom, like: who, that, what, her, whose, him and excommunicate.

Who whom questions examples?

  • Whom did you talk to? Whom would you rather have as a boss?
  • Who did you talk to? Who would you rather have as a boss?
  • To whom did you speak? With whom did she go?
  • Who did you speak to? Who did she go with?
Who I report to or whom I report to?

Whom should I report to is correct. You use “whom” when it involves an objective pronoun and “who” when it involves a subjective pronoun.

What type of pronoun is whom?

Pronoun TypeMembers of the SubclassRelativethat, which, who, whose, whom, where, whenDemonstrativethis, that, these, thoseInterrogativewho, what, why, where, when, whateverIndefiniteanything, anybody, anyone, something, somebody, someone, nothing, nobody, none, no one

Who's dog or whose dog?

Whose that dog?” is never correct. “Who’s that dog?” is correct if you mean to ask who the dog is. “Who’s” is a contraction of “who is”. “Whose is that dog?” is correct if you mean to ask who the owner of the dog is.

Whose and who's sentence examples?

Chicago, a city (who’s, whose) architecture is admired all over the world, has a population of over 2 million residents. (Who’s, Whose) yellow car is parked in front of your house? William Faulkner, (who’s, whose) books I read in high school, remains one of my favorite authors.

Whose idea or who's idea?

Here, the correct phrasing is whose idea, not who’s idea. The question is actually “to whom does this idea belong” or “who came up with this idea?” As a result, the phrase is about finding out who possesses the idea. Therefore, we need a possessive pronoun like whose instead of a contraction like who is.

Who saved whom?

Who Saved Whom is a volunteer operated non-profit 501(c)3 Public Charity, founded by Jarita Moore, to bring together Veterans and shelter dogs to mutually benefit from professionally mentored dog training, exercise, and socialization activities.

Who I admire or whom I admire?

Obviously, the proper word is who. Compare that with He is a man who I admire. Because we would say I admire him, the sentence should read He is a man whom I admire. The key to mastering whom comes down to knowing the difference between a subject and an object.